A detailed training log for the week is here.

This weekend was host to three major events, the Leadville Trail 100 Run, the Pikes Peak Ascent and the Pikes Peak Marathon.

The Leadville 100 is based in the Colorado mountains, and is a 100 mile out and back course with elevations ranging from 9200 feet to 12,600 feet.  This year’s male winner was Thomas Lorblanchet who posted a finishing time of 16 hours, 29 minutes.  My personal favorite, Anton Krupicka lead the majority of the race but ultimately finished in fourth place crossing the line in 17 hours, 21 minutes.

Pikes Peak Ascent, Simon Gutierrez

Take a look at this excerpt from the Pikes Peak home page, describing their events:

The Pikes Peak Ascent® and Pikes Peak Marathon® will redefine what you call running. Sure, they start out like a lot of races on Any Street, USA. But your first left turn will have you turning in the direction of up! During the next 10 miles, as you gain almost 6,000 vertical feet, your legs, lungs, heart and mind will be worn to a ragged nothingness. But it won’t be until the next three miles, with still over 2,000′ of vertical to go, that you will realize where the Marathon got its moniker—America’s Ultimate Challenge.

There’s a reason trees don’t bother growing above 12,000′ on Pikes Peak. They can’t! Makes one wonder if trees are smarter than runners. Above treeline most runners take 30 minutes or more, some much more, just to cover a mile. What little air remains can’t satisfy the endless stream of zombies hoping only to survive their next step. It’s a death march right out of a scene from Dawn of the Dead. Adding insult to injury it might start to snow!

It’s at this point if you are on the deluxe tour you must turn around and run back down the mountain for the second half of the Marathon. Along the way protruding rocks and roots are waiting to send you crashing to the ground mangling flesh and only temporarily masking the pain of blood filled blisters. Meanwhile, the temperature has often risen by more than 30 degrees since the start of the race. After all, it’s always best to cook raw meat.

The Pikes Peak Ascent is 13.32 miles in distance with a vertical climb of 7,815 feet. The 2012 overall winner was Jason Delaney with a chip time of 2:13:18, while Sage Canaday, a former member of the Hanson-Brooks training team continues to impress as a recent convert to trail and ultra races. Canaday took fourth overall, clocking a chip time of 2:21:16.

Killian Journet, ultra, trail and mountain marathon legend, took first place in the Pikes Peak marathon.  Killian is a member of the Salomon Trail Running team and you can follow a series of video production documenting his training and races here.

Reading List

These are three books in my Kindle library that I highly recommend.  Instead of doing the author’s an injustice by trying to review each book here, I’ll provide links to the books and author’s pages instead.

101 Simple Ways to be a Better Runner: A Short Guide to Running Faster, Preventing Injuries and Feeling Great 

Jason Fitzgerald

Daniels’ Running Formula: Second Edition

Jack Daniels

Run Faster from the 5k to the Marathon: How to be Your Own Best Coach

Matt Fitzgerald and Brad Hudson

 

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