Archive for the ‘misc’ Category

A detailed training log for the week is here.

Like many people who become involved in a new activity I love to research and read all the information I can get my hands on. Where I often fall short, however, is in translating my enthusiasm and new found knowledge into action.

From too many different sources to list, all respectable, qualified and accomplished in both endurance training theory and real world results, I have learned that my easy day runs must be just that: easy, slower than normal pace, and within roughly a 60% to 70% window of my maximum heart rate.

Surprise. Surprise. After almost 3 months of training, I really have not been applying this to my own running.  I made a concerted effort last week to make this happen and as a result I ran my first half marathon distance.

While you really don’t need to hear it from me, her goes: most people run too hard on their easy days and too easily on their hard days.

Make your training count! Have a goal and purpose for every run that you do, and recite that goal aloud before taking your first step.

Reward your efforts with quality food and your body will thank you.

 

Red Meat or Tofu? It Probably Doesn’t Matter

In a classic example of the fighting the wrong battle while the war rages on elsewhere, many of us are often caught up in the arguments for and against eating meat, vegetarianism, vegan lifestyles or even the fruitarian viewpoint. While we slug it out with one another in the trenches, belittling each other’s choices and creating an ever greater divide among us as consumers who like to pretend we are making more informed decisions, the government, politicians and agribusiness giants are busy raking in millions, laughing all the way to the bank, and potentially poisoning all of us, while forever altering the genetic code in ways that evolution never intended.

Genetically Modified Organisms and Foods (GMOs GMFs) are escalating at an alarming rate, entering our food production and distribution chain without the slightest pretense of legitimate testing or oversight. Despite corporate and state claims to the contrary, just recall any memories you may have about the tobacco industry’s scientists and attorneys when you weigh idea of fair, balanced or objective scrutiny and safeguards in relation to this industry.

Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives is a great primer on the topic if you’re interested. The film is a production of the Institute for Responsible Technology and can be viewed online. However, you can also order a dvd copy which brings additional bonus footage and four additional mini presentations on related topics.

An excerpt from the film’s website:

When the US government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified (GM) crops into our environment and food supply, it was a gamble of unprecedented proportions. The health of all living things and all future generations were put at risk by an infant technology.

After two decades, physicians and scientists have uncovered a grave trend. The same serious health problems found in lab animals, livestock, and pets that have been fed GM foods are now on the rise in the US population. And when people and animals stop eating genetically modified organisms (GMOs), their health improves.

This seminal documentary provides compelling evidence to help explain the deteriorating health of Americans, especially among children, and offers a recipe for protecting ourselves and our future.

 

Good Kitty Kat

Posted: September 13, 2012 in misc, Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

I’ll take all the support I can get

Small Changes Keep You Healthy

A detailed training log for the week is here.

Running seems so simple, and I guess it can be. Just lace up your shoes, or not, if you’re the barefoot type, and head out the door.

One danger we face, however, is running the same mileage and pace over the same surfaces while wearing the same shoes. Just so we can cross the workout off of the ‘must-do’ list.

Pretty. But not what I want to face everyday.

I live in suburban San Jose, Costa Rica and there isn’t a single road in my immediate neighborhood that stretches more than about three quarters of a mile before turning into a giant hill or series of hills, that don’t necessarily lend themselves to fulfilling every day’s training plan.

While I appreciate the benefits of running rolling hills, it’s not something I want to do on every run. So I run only the (relatively) flat sections of my local neighborhood, basically making a turn anytime I come to the foot of a hill that’s large enough to represent a significant change in the training stimulus.

The risk I run (no pun intended) with this technique is traveling over the exact same portion of road and running surface on every run, every week.  The body needs different stimulus in order to adapt, recover and grow stronger. Running over different surfaces and in different shoes causes slight changes in which muscles, tendons and ligaments are stressed and by how much. All of these tiny variables contribute to fitness.  Never change the input variables and your body will likely respond via fatigue at one end of the spectrum and overuse injuries at the other end.

To keep my legs fresh and confused I like to mix things up ever so slightly.  I rotate among three to four different pairs of shoes, ranging from a fairly neutral trainer to an extreme minimalist flat. Each day that I run I alternate the direction from which I leave my home, allowing me to cover the same local loop but covering the crests, ridges, potholes and crowns from a different angle. During any single run I will also move to the center of the road, whenever safe to do so, so I have a flatter surface beneath my feet, and I also move off into the grass for about 1/8 of a mile each time I pass a local park.

As far as pace and strength are concerned, once a week I run a series of hill sprints after an easy paced run, and on other days I add fartleks into the mix. Each fartlek I run is on a different section of the road or grass: some on flat stretches, and others may be either ascending or descending ever so slightly.

While seemingly insignificant during the actual run, over time these small variables can make a big difference in our fitness, performance and injury prevention.  Not to mention, if you’re limited by your local geography in regards to running terrain these small changes can keep you feeling mentally fresh as well.

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photo credit

From our friends over at Distant Runners.  Well said!